She Got Schooled

Yesterday, I heard How Long by Lipps Inc. for the first time. Immediately, I felt like a little schoolgirl but acted all super butch. No one around me noticed what was going on deep inside of moi. (Not that this is a change from any other day.)
Anyways, I got my disco lesson.

If you don’t know what I’m about, just listen to Justus Köhncke’s club hit from 2004, Timecode, which I now love even more.

p.s. and of course How Long is a cover version to begin with

Neo Reflector Babies

Disco Lashes

For the second time, I lost my Viktor & Rolf Shu Umera lashes this weekend in a drunk’n’drag accident. Today looked into buying them for a third time. Hoping it is going to be a charm.

That’s when I saw these babies: “inspired by architectural approach of future fashion, these elegant, silver coated lashes softly sparkle with moon shape sequins.”

And the shopping list is longer again.
Now, I need to work on making it shorter. WORK!

So Neo

The Disco Files

The Disco Files 1973-78 is a new book by Vince Aletti and djhistory.com, to be released April 20 (pre-order here). It sounds very much like a new nerd bible, containing Vince’s weekly reports from New York”™s club scene, his magazine articles, 800 club and DJ charts and tons of record reviews.

Aletti was the first person to write about disco in an article published in Rolling Stone in 1973. He became a senior editor at The Village Voice, and is currently the photography critic for The New Yorker.

The 30 page pdf preview of the book includes an excerpt of his ’73 disco article and some great pictures. Some of the pictures might look familiar, as they have been published in the other disco bible Love Saves The Day by Tim Lawrence.

The D Files

From an interview with Vince Aletti:

Did people at [Paradise] Garage regard the Studio 54 as the anti-Christ?
To an extent. I certainly did. It was not what we thought this was all about. David’s [Mancuso] idealism was very widespread in terms of the way people felt. I think disco was, to some extent, a movement and a lot of people felt very strongly. And a lot of people got very caught up in what they felt it should and shouldn’t be.

What was the reaction when Studio 54 took off?
It’s hard for me to say, besides what I already said. There’s a scene at the end of the Last Days Of Disco one of the characters has this very idealistic speech where he says disco was a whole movement. It was funny, but it was really true and people felt that. They felt disappointed that the idealistic quality of it was being trampled over, in favour of money and celebrity. As much as disco was glitzy and certainly loved celebrity culture when people came to clubs, there was never a sense of it being driven by that. It was much more driven by an underground idea of unity.

(via disco delivery & more information)

Let A Lady Moan

When 100% Pure Love by Crystal Waters came out, my Bavarian friend Kiki and I were all over the dance floor of our favourite club, Construction Five (Yes, there were lots of Bauarbeiter, we loved das Milieu. And yes, they let underage girls in).

Had I asked myself where 100% Pure Love’s cowbell came from, I would have stumbled across the following treasure before: Jeanette “Lady” Day – Come Let Me Love You. First pressed as a 12″ on the legendary New York disco label Prelude, it got a so-called Mastermix treatment by Shep Pettibone in 1982. This was one of the mixes that were featured on Shep’s radio show and the biggest mixes were subsequently released on a Prelude compilation.

But now, without further ado, please enjoy the moans and cowbells of Jeanette “Lady” Day.
Download it at the great Beat Electric or listen below.

*attention: well known Madonna trivia following*
I bet Madonna must have heard Jeanette moaning in the 80ties. Why else would she have called Shep? First a couple of remixes for the lady (Color Mix of True Blue) until he finally produced Vogue for Ms. Ciccone.

Dress You Up

I’ve been doing some Madonna research lately (more on that later) and came across this short clip of Madonna performing Dress You Up at Keith Haring’s Party of Life in May 1984 at the Paradise Garage, almost 6 months before the Like A Virgin album was released.

By Keith Haring (source):
“In the spring of 1984, it’s time for my birthday, and I stage what I call my Party of Life event. I want to make this into quite a grand affair. The fact is, I’m now making a certain amount of money and I feel a certain guilt about it, and I want to share it with my friends… you know, sharing the wealth! So I plan this big party, which is for my birthday, but not on my birthday.

I ask Madonna if she could sing at the party and she agrees. As a matter of fact, she had been to my studio just days earlier to play me some cuts from her new album ‘Like A Virgin.’, at which time hadn’t come out yet. I immediately liked “Dress You Up” and “Like a Virgin”, and we decide she’ll sing these two songs at the party. While we’re hearing these songs, I do a painting on Madonna’s leather jacket which she wears to the party. Madonna decides that she wants to sing these two songs on a brass bed covered with frilly material and strewn with white roses.

I decide to hold the party at Paradise Garage, because it continues to be my clubhouse and the coolest club in New York. Although only open weekends, I persuade the owner to let me hire the club out on a Wednesday night. I now ask LAII ( and myself and other friends of Keith ) to help me decorate the place. We make these huge cotton banners, which we spray paint in fluorescent colors. We hang these around the club. We also hang fluorescent streamers everywhere, and in another room we erect these huge fluorescent pillars and vases with flowers in them. We also hang some of my huge vinyl tarps so that the event also turns into a big exhibition.” (Read the full text)

The flyers for the event can be found here

A Night in London

I leave my place at around 9 to walk to the cinema to see The Godfather of Disco (trailer) at its UK premiere. As I arrive at the venue I see Mel Cheren head into the theatre. And just by chance I sit right next to him during the screening. The film is loosely based on Mel’s autobiography and features lots of interviews. Apart from Mel’s story, I found the interviews with Junior Vasquez (of all people) and Kevin Hedge of Blaze (he cute) most interesting. Also, it was very sad to see some of speeches that were held during Larry Levan’s funeral service.
After the documentary, I said hi to Mel and the director, Gene Graham. Now, let’s hope they’re getting some good distribution for the movie, that you can see it.

Then I rushed across town to get to the Prince afterparty. As Toffi is coming over next weekend and we’re heading to a Prince concert, I didn’t want to spoil the big arena experience and decided not to go to one of the main shows before. Although, Prince does not perform at every afterparty, I was very optimistic.

So, I get there at a quarter to one. 15 minutes later Prince hits the stage. Dressed in a red suit, red hat with big red feathers on top. His keyboard is set up in the middle of the stage and he starts with two Stevie Wonder cover versions, Superstition and Higher Ground, before moving on to A Love Bizarre. The audience goes crazy. He does back up vocals for Marva King on the Chaka Khan cover of Sweet Thing. Then, The Ballad of Dorothy Parker.
Most of the songs feature saxophone solos by Maceo Parker, of James Brown and Parliament/George Clinton fame.

The whole atmosphere on stage is quite relaxed. At one point Prince sings:
“Learn to work the toilet seat – If it’s up – Put it down” (from the new song, The Rules)
And gets the audience to repeat the lines.

A couple of classic covers follow, like Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin). Prince and the band leave the stage at 2:30 am.

Just one more thing, when he first got on stage, I thought he had scarfed his face just like in the old days. That would have been the icing on the cake.

Watch this site as it turns into a Prince fan page.

Larry has a Mariah Number of 2

1. And I Don’t Love You by Smokey Robinson was jointly remixed by Larry Levan and Benny Medina
2. Benny Medina is Mariah’s current manager

I wasn’t aware that Benny Medina was a remixer. This is exciting.
Sometimes I think everyone is connected to Mariah.

The Larry Levan & Benny Medina remix is available at disco delivery.
Thanks for the insights. Love it.
Black and white rainbows, colourful shadows…

Earlier:
Reality or Concept, Robin Williams and Larry Levan at the Paradise Garage